5 Biblical Ways to Respond to Injustice

5 Biblical Ways to Respond to Injustice

Most of us will experience some form of slander or rejection during our lifetime. 

Our world is fallen. Life isn’t fair (John 16:33).(1)

Sometimes people treat us selfishly, return evil for good, tell lies to us and about us, cut off communication with us, say cruel things, have no sympathy or interest in us. 

It matters how we respond to narcissists, liars, and selfish people. We don’t want to become like them in our response (Proverbs 4:14). 

So we should:
5 Biblical Ways to Respond to Injustice
1. Always press into the Lord, not pull away from Him. It’s not His fault.
James 1:13 
See When Bad Things Happen.

2. Remember that Jesus suffered rejection, injustice, slander, and physical abuse for us.  
Hebrews 12:1-6

3. Pray for our enemies and refuse to get bitter.
Matthew 5:44, Ephesians 4:31

4. Ignore the taunts of our enemies and the lies of Satan.
Revelation 12:10-12

5. Forget the past and press on to the future.
Philippians 3:12-14
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(1) God promises that people will reap what they sow (Galatians 6:7), but that does not necessarily happen here on earth. There is a final judgment and a final punishment for all who reject Christ, and there is a loss of rewards for Christians who don’t take their Christianity seriously. See Christianity & Karma Are Not Compatible, A Trophy For Everyone, and  Why Christians Face a Final Judgment

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Pain - The Gift Nobody Wants

Pain - The Gift Nobody Wants

Pain is a gift nobody wants. But it's a gift, just the same.

We don’t ask for it or enjoy it, but we all experience it in one form or another.

My friend Peggie says, "Pain always brings change."

Pain - The Gift Nobody Wants
She's right. We can let it disable us with bitterness, anger, and depression. Or we can let it equip us with wisdom, sensitivity, humility, and grace.

When I’m suffering, I want to remind God of Bible passages where He rescues His people. I want to forget about the more prevalent passages where He loves His followers enough to let them suffer for their good and the good of others (e.g. Joseph and Paul).

We discipline our children, make them get shots, even give them over to doctors for surgery...because we love them. They could (and sometimes do) accuse us of letting them needlessly suffer. But they don’t understand.

As God’s children, we often misunderstand too. He doesn’t promise to prevent pain (Hebrews 12:1-11). He promises to use it for our good (Romans 8:28).

Help us, Lord, to see our pain the right way.
This post first published on Bible Love Notes in 2012

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God Creates Evil??? No Way!


Some folks are eager to find things that make God look bad. Recently, someone brought Isaiah 45:7 to my attention for this purpose:
“I form the light, and create darkness: I make peace, and create evil: I the LORD do all these things.” KJV(1)


By ignoring the rest of Scripture, they concluded that God is responsible for evil.

However:

1. Scripture explains that God created a perfect world and when mankind sinned, evil entered the world.(2)

2. Scripture describes God as pure goodness, love and light.(3)

3. The Hebrew word ra' in this passage is best translated “adversity,” not evil.(4)

4. The context of the passage is reward and punishment, not the origin of good and evil.(5)

God does create justice through adversity: He punishes unrepentant sinners and refines the faith of His children through adversity.

But He doesn’t create sin, encourage sin, or cause sin.(6)

Many verses in Scripture, when pulled out of context or read in a single translation can appear to say something they don’t.(7)
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 (1) The King James is a good translation, but just like other good translations, it has passages that don't best reflect the original Greek and Hebrew. That's one reason it's good to study several good translations. The original Hebrew and Greek are the most accurate forms of Scripture, but God intended for all languages to enjoy His Word, so we shouldn't get too hyper about translation differences. Many of the Hebrew and Greek words have no equivalent in other languages, so we do the best we can.

No translation is "perfect" but all of the major translations are good for reading and study. The King James Version was written before the oldest manuscripts of Scripture were discovered (the Dead Sea Scrolls), so it contains passages not included in the original manuscripts but added later by scribes. These added passages do not contradict Scripture, but the newer translations omit them because they were not part of the original manuscripts. Some people claim that newer translations are less accurate than the KJV due to these missing passages. That's not true.

See Isaiah 45:7 in the NIV,
ESV, NASB, NLT HERE and GNT, AMP, and NKJV HERE.


For more on translations, see: Why Are the Newer Translations Missing Verses?, Missing Bible Verses, Is the King James the Only Reliable Bible?

(2)  Genesis 1:31; Genesis 3
(3)  Punishing evil is a good thing and God promises to do so: Isaiah 13:11, Revelation 21:5-8.
God also uses adversity to discipline His children so they will turn from sin: Hebrews 12:1-12. And He uses adversity to refine our faith: 1 Peter 1:6-7.

(4)  Strong’s Concordance
(5)  Isaiah 45
(6)  There is no darkness in God: 1 John 1:5. God never causes sin: James 1:13. Everything coming from God’s hand is good: James 1:17.
(7)  See Pieces Parts, Prayer in Context, 3 Ways to Discern Spiritual Truths.  

Would you like to do a short Bible study on this devotion? Then check out today's Bite Size Bible study.

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Fasting When You're Still Eating


While authorities disagree about the benefits of fasting, many believe it gives the digestive system a needed rest so it can rid itself of toxins. 

Fasting and prayer is certainly Scriptural.(1)

But I want to suggest some fasts that have nothing to do with food – fasts to rid our souls of toxins that may be damaging our spiritual health.

How about:

1. An entertainment fast(2)
Give up Secular TV, movies, books and music for a determined time to regain sensitivity to the ungodly toxins they contain.

2. A spending fast(3)
Refuse to buy anything except necessities for a determined time to regain perspective on the difference between wants and needs.

3. A social media fast(4)
Turn off technology and actively invest in your flesh-and-blood relationships.

4. A noise fast(5)
Try sitting silently with God’s Word and see if the world’s noise has been drowning out His voice.

So what do you think? Do you need to do some fasting?
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(1) These are some of the New Testament references to fasting:
Matthew 6:16-18; Luke 4:2-4; Acts 13:2-4; Acts 14:23

(2) These 1-minute devotions might help you ponder your entertainment choices Biblically:
Haunted, No Shades of Grey, Soft-Core Christians.

(3) For helpful 1-minute devotions about material wealth, see the archive of Money & Things.

(4) For helpful 1-minute devotions about relationships, check out the Relationships Archive.

(5) Check out this 1-minute devotion about noise: Cacophony - Psalm 46:10.

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Biblical Guard Rails, Safety Rules, and Exit Ramps


“A fence at the top of the precipice is far better than an ambulance at the bottom of it.” J. Sidlow Baxter*

Some Christians overemphasize rules, but not all rules are bad. Some are like fences or guardrails that prevent our car from careening over the edge into a valley of sin.

Sometimes we need guardrails and other times we need safety rules. 

When we come to an intersection we need to look both ways, evaluate the oncoming dangers, and proceed only if the road is clear. 

We’ve all had “spiritual accidents” and ended up on unsafe roads that led to overeating, overspending, anger, immorality, irresponsibility, etc.

If we get ourselves in the middle of a temptation traffic jam, God promises to provide a way out (1 Corinthians 10:13). But He warns us to avoid unsafe roads altogether (2 Timothy 2:22).

We need guardrails and safety rules; and if neither work, we need to hurry off the exit ramp that God provides.

* Awake My Heart (Nov. 9-11) by J. Sidlow Baxter, Zondervan, 1960

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